Posts Tagged algorithm

LINQ-Style Generic Algorithms for Burst

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We’ve seen how to create powerful, Burst-compatible generic algorithms already, but today we’ll take another approach to generic algorithms and implement them in the style of C#’s LINQ. Along the way, we’ll tackle a new challenge by implementing a generic algorithm that allocates a new collection.

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Type-Agnostic Generic Algorithms

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We looked at some generic algorithm examples in the previous article, but they weren’t very generic in one respect: they all required a NativeArray<T>. What if we wanted to make them more generic so they could work on any type of collection? Today’s article shows two ways to do just that!

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Generic Algorithm Examples

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There are many common algorithms that we use constantly: searching, filtering, mapping, and so forth. Today we’ll write a few in the Burst-friendly way as examples of how to write Burst-friendly code that’s still reusable and efficient.

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Burst-Compiled Generic Algorithms

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Many algorithms get used over and over: searching, sorting, filtering, etc. C# makes these available with LINQ and functions like Array.Sort, but these can’t be compiled by Burst because interfaces and delegates aren’t supported. So how do we implement these generic algorithms to avoid re-writing them over and over? Today we’ll explore one technique to solve this problem. Read on to learn how!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 8

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NativeArray<T> is great, but very limited in functionality. We can fix this surprisingly easily! Today we revive a two year old series that created the iterator project. Iterators are like a no-GC version of IEnumerable<T> and LINQ which have a lot of power but only support managed arrays (T[]) and List<T>. Today we’ll add support for NativeArray<T> and inherit support for the same functionality. We’ll also spruce up the project with proper unit tests, assembly definitions, and runtime tests to confirm that zero garbage is created. Read on to see how this was done and how to use iterators with NativeArray<T>.

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 7

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Today we’ll wrap up the iterator series by finishing up porting C++’s <algorithm> header. We end up with a library of functions for common LINQ-style algorithms but without any of the garbage creation that slows our games down. Read on for the source and examples!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 6

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We’re nearing the end of the series to build a no-garbage replacement for System.Linq. Today we tackle functions that work on already-sorted ranges and functions that work on ranges that are in heap order. These include common set operations like “union” and “intersection”. Read on to see how to use them and for the updated library that you can use to eliminate your garbage creation!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 5

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This week we continue with iterators to get the functionality of IEnumerable without the nasty garbage creation. This week the little iterator library gets support for sorting and binary searching. Read on for the details!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 4

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Back from a brief break, we pick up this week by finishing up the “modifying sequence operations” with some gems like RandomShuffle and go through the “partitions” category with functions like Partition and IsPartitioned. These are all solid algorithms with a lot of potential uses, so read on to see how to use them with iterators and for the source code that implements them!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 3

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Continuing the series this week we’ll delve into the iterator functions that modify the sequence. This includes handy tools like Copy, SwapRanges, and Transform. Of course this is all done without creating any garbage! Read on to see how and for the full source code.

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