Posts Tagged array

Three IL2CPP Optimizations

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This week we’ll take a break from the C++ Scripting series to explore three optimizations we can make to our C# code so that IL2CPP generates faster C++ code for us. We’ll cover three areas that yield big speedups: casting, array bounds checking, and null checking.

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C++ Scripting: Part 27 – Foreach Loops

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C++ doesn’t have a foreach keyword, but it does have an equivalent in “range for loops”. Today we’ll implement support for them so we can easily loop over arrays and types implementing IEnumerable and IEnumerable<T>.

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C++ Scripting: Part 20 – Performance Improvements

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The last time we looked at performance was way back in part four of the series. Ever since then we’ve been relentlessly adding more and more features to the C++ scripting system. So today we’ll take a break from feature additions to improve the system’s performance in a couple of key areas.

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C++ Scripting: Part 18 – Array Index Operator

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When we covered arrays in part 14, we skipped implementing the [] operator with them. Instead, we opted for a simpler pair of GetItem and SetItem functions. Today we’ll address that oversight so our C++ game code can index arrays just like in C#.

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C++ Scripting: Part 14 – Arrays

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The series continues by adding support for a major feature: arrays. These are used very frequently throughout the Unity and .NET APIs and the lack of support for them has been a big missing piece of the puzzle for most games. The GitHub project has been updated to support single- and multi-dimensional arrays. Read on to learn how this support was implemented!

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Should You Cache Array.Length and List.Count?

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Every time I see for (var i = 0; i < array.Length; ++i) I wonder if accessing that Length property is slow. Should I cache it? It's comforting to know that for (int i = 0, len = array.Length; i < len; ++i) is only dealing with local variables except on the first loop. Local variables must be faster, right? Likewise, I wonder the same thing about List<T>.Count. I finally got around to running a test to see if caching these length properties makes any performance difference. The answers might surprise you!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 7

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Today we’ll wrap up the iterator series by finishing up porting C++’s <algorithm> header. We end up with a library of functions for common LINQ-style algorithms but without any of the garbage creation that slows our games down. Read on for the source and examples!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 6

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We’re nearing the end of the series to build a no-garbage replacement for System.Linq. Today we tackle functions that work on already-sorted ranges and functions that work on ranges that are in heap order. These include common set operations like “union” and “intersection”. Read on to see how to use them and for the updated library that you can use to eliminate your garbage creation!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 5

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This week we continue with iterators to get the functionality of IEnumerable without the nasty garbage creation. This week the little iterator library gets support for sorting and binary searching. Read on for the details!

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Enumerables Without the Garbage: Part 4

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Back from a brief break, we pick up this week by finishing up the “modifying sequence operations” with some gems like RandomShuffle and go through the “partitions” category with functions like Partition and IsPartitioned. These are all solid algorithms with a lot of potential uses, so read on to see how to use them with iterators and for the source code that implements them!

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